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    • CommentRowNumber1.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 25th 2010

    since we were talking about rigged Hilbert spaces, I figured it was time to create an entry on John Roberts

    • CommentRowNumber2.
    • CommentAuthorTodd_Trimble
    • CommentTimeOct 25th 2010

    Looks good; thanks. I assume John Roberts is Australian; no relation to our own David Roberts?

    • CommentRowNumber3.
    • CommentAuthorTim_Porter
    • CommentTimeOct 25th 2010

    John Roberts was born in England, (I think), but his father came from the Llŷn Peninsula. He has worked in Rome at Tor Vergata for a long time.

    • CommentRowNumber4.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 25th 2010

    John Roberts was born in England, (I think), but his father came from the Llŷn Peninsula. He has worked in Rome at Tor Vergata for a long time.

    Some kind Lab-elf pasted this into the entry at John Roberts

    • CommentRowNumber5.
    • CommentAuthorTim_Porter
    • CommentTimeOct 25th 2010

    @Urs. I am not 100% certain of my facts about John Roberts. I have met him and discussed the family background as he had arrived at the conference from visiting in North Wales. I was merely pointing out the obvious, namely that North Wales produces good n-category theorist. s:-)

    We should check a bit more before putting the background there otherwise we might perpetuates an untruth!

    • CommentRowNumber6.
    • CommentAuthorDavidRoberts
    • CommentTimeOct 25th 2010

    The irony is, my father’s name is John Roberts, but this is not him. But with such a common name, it is not unexpected. When I was an undergraduate, there was another David Roberts (or two!) on campus.

    • CommentRowNumber7.
    • CommentAuthorTim_Porter
    • CommentTimeOct 25th 2010

    In our area we have Williams, Roberts, and Jones. (Slightly fewer than in some parts of Wales.) The phone book has nearly a full page of J. Roberts (small type face!!!!) (I could tell David how many inches of D. Roberts there are .. if he is interested.) I should say that this is just North Wales, there are other Phone Books!

    • CommentRowNumber8.
    • CommentAuthorDavidRoberts
    • CommentTimeOct 26th 2010

    @Tim, I still remember when I first introduced myself at Streetfest you said “Not another David Roberts” :)

    • CommentRowNumber9.
    • CommentAuthorTim_Porter
    • CommentTimeOct 26th 2010

    @David Remember St David is the patron saint of Wales.

    • CommentRowNumber10.
    • CommentAuthorDavidRoberts
    • CommentTimeOct 26th 2010

    I know, I know, there are many a Davey/Davie/Davy/Dafydd/Dewi/Dai/Daf/Taff/Taffy out there in ol’ Cymru.

    • CommentRowNumber11.
    • CommentAuthorTim_Porter
    • CommentTimeOct 26th 2010

    Taff really refers to people from Cardiff only. The River there is the Afon Taff. (Nice city with some good functional analysts in it!)

    • CommentRowNumber12.
    • CommentAuthorTobyBartels
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2010

    Does that mean that a traditional Celtic poet from Cardiff is a Bardd of Afon?

    • CommentRowNumber13.
    • CommentAuthorTim_Porter
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2010
    • (edited Oct 28th 2010)

    Weak joke. :-(

    On a non-Mathematical aside, I find if interesting that so many rivers in England have celtic names. Far fewer other features have retained their pre-Anglo-Saxon names. (There is some discussion in archaeology in the UK as to the real extent and nature of the Anglo-Saxon invasions, so the foundation myths of the English (and the Welsh, and the Bretons, …) are being questioned.)

    (For those of you who have never needed to have any knowledge of Welsh names etc., afon (pronounced ’avon’ but with a short ’a’ is the Welsh word for river.)

    • CommentRowNumber14.
    • CommentAuthorTim_Porter
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2010

    @Zoran reacting to your slipped in remark on another thread! Stratford upon Avon. Interesting example: Stratford = straight ford because near there a Roman road went through a river. This is purely English in derivation. In this case the river Avon = the river river. (Note the town of Bath is also on a river Avon, and is nowhere near Stratford.)

    • CommentRowNumber15.
    • CommentAuthorTobyBartels
    • CommentTimeNov 1st 2010

    @ Tim #13: I didn’t realise that the name was quite so generic as that! I should have looked it up.

    @ Tim #14: So ‘Stratford upon Avon’ means the straight ford upon the river, as if there might be a straight ford somewhere else!

    • CommentRowNumber16.
    • CommentAuthorTim_Porter
    • CommentTimeNov 1st 2010
    • (edited Nov 1st 2010)

    Actually in Somerset there is a very straight part of a small river of length about 200m(<-metres not miles!) which is a road, so there the ford is in the river. (This is near Cheddar. I mention that because there are a large number of people in the world who eat the cheese called Cheddar without realising that it is the name of a town, and in fact of a beautiful Gorge, and no I do not get paid by the Somerset Tourist Board. My family comes from that area.) The Rivers Severn, Don, Adur, Thames, Ouse, etc are all pre-Saxon.

    There is a small town near Milton Keynes called Stoney Stratford, and that is very descriptive. There is a village called Streton-on-the-Fosse. (Work that one out.)

    But enough of this fascinating non-maths. (Toby, look out for the book Stories of English, by David Crystal. Excellent read.)

    • CommentRowNumber17.
    • CommentAuthorzskoda
    • CommentTimeNov 1st 2010

    Tim, thank you for a lovely toponymic instruction! (I never passed through Bath, the town of which I learned from Jane Austin (Northanger Abbey (wikipedia)) while taking pre-romantism/romantism-centered English literature class from late Ivo Vidan in Fall 1992.

    • CommentRowNumber18.
    • CommentAuthorTim_Porter
    • CommentTimeNov 1st 2010

    My family is from not far from there. Bath is a beautiful city with the Georgian terraces etc. and Roman baths, which still have their natural supply of hot water. If you are in the south of the UK sometime and have a little time to spend, look at Bath and then go up the Cotswold Hills back up towards Gloucester and then east towards Oxford. Not far but some lovely villages in a honey coloured stone. (Have a look at pictures of Bath and wander around using Google Earth!!!)

    • CommentRowNumber19.
    • CommentAuthorTim_Porter
    • CommentTimeAug 12th 2015

    Sad news. I just received this from David Evans in Cardiff: >

    Dear Colleagues and Friends,

    we deeply regret to have to communicate another terrible piece of news concerning our community: our close friend, collaborator and colleague John E. Roberts passed away on August 3rd in Goettingen - where he and his wife Duerten had moved in the recent years.

    John was hospitalized since few days, having broken a leg and undergone the necessary surgery. He did not recover from it due to some severe complications occurring thereafter.

    It is a terrific loss, for the close personal relations, for our subject, for science; we feel very much near to the children Mark, Linda and Jenny, and especially to Duerten, who is facing a very difficult moment.

    Sergio Doplicher, Detlev Buchholz and Roberto Longo

    • CommentRowNumber20.
    • CommentAuthorDavidRoberts
    • CommentTimeAug 12th 2015

    A pity.

    (How’s this bit of historical trivia: my wife’s maiden name was Breen…)

    • CommentRowNumber21.
    • CommentAuthorTodd_Trimble
    • CommentTimeAug 12th 2015

    David R, I assume no relation to JR. He was also Australian though, right?

    I had only recently learned of the passing of Stephen Schanuel and of R.F.C. (Bob) Walters. Bob was in his early 70’s, I believe – not very old. His last blog entry was from a hospital bed, IIRC. Sad news indeed.

    • CommentRowNumber22.
    • CommentAuthorDavidRoberts
    • CommentTimeAug 12th 2015

    I refer the learned gentleman to #2 and #6.

    Yes, Walters’ blog I hope will be preserved. He also had a bunch of stuff on there are one point that was taken down for reorganising, IIRC, and never got put back up, which is a pity. I hope the files are still floating around the computer.

    • CommentRowNumber23.
    • CommentAuthorDavidRoberts
    • CommentTimeAug 12th 2015

    I note that JER has no wikipedia page, so we’d better make sure our facts are correct in case we get cited by someone making one!

    • CommentRowNumber24.
    • CommentAuthorDmitri Pavlov
    • CommentTimeApr 24th 2021

    Name redirects.

    diff, v9, current

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