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    • CommentRowNumber1.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeFeb 3rd 2013
    • CommentRowNumber2.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeSep 3rd 2014

    added more details to the definition at Lie-Poisson structure

    • CommentRowNumber3.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2014

    have added some trivialities to Lie-Poisson structure:

    • CommentRowNumber4.
    • CommentAuthorzskoda
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2014

    There is also the entry Poisson-Lie group.

    • CommentRowNumber5.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2014

    Well, all right then, I have moved the relevant paragraph there from the Idea-section to the examples section and added a cross-link here.

    More serious is that we also have linear Poisson structure as a parallel entry stub, which is however synonymous with Lie-Poisson structure. I have cross-linked them for the moment, but eventually they ought to be merged.

    • CommentRowNumber6.
    • CommentAuthorzskoda
    • CommentTimeNov 27th 2014
    • (edited Nov 27th 2014)

    Maybe it is not entirely synonymous in literature. For examples linear Poisson structures certainly do not include generalizations like for Lie algebroids. Second if you take a symplectic leaf not only the whole 𝔤 *\mathfrak{g}^*, or any isomorphic symplectic manifold, or union of several such leaves, one still says linear Poisson structure while it does not complete to “Lie” thing. Third one also looks at the global bundle over a Lie group, like in the paper of Gutt, what is not the same as just 𝔤 *\mathfrak{g}^*. But, surely all these are minor issues.

    To me the title “Lie-Poisson structure” is more confusing, as I never know if they mean the Lie algebra or Lie group version.

    • CommentRowNumber7.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeNov 27th 2014
    • (edited Nov 27th 2014)

    The way to read is with brackets to the right:

    • a Lie-\langlePoisson structure\rangle is a Poisson structure coming from a Lie bracket;

    • A Poisson-\langleLie group\rangle is a Lie group with Poisson data.

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