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    • CommentRowNumber1.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2013
    • (edited Oct 23rd 2013)

    Since it touches on several of the threads that we happen to have here, hopefully I may be excused for making this somewhat selfish post here.

    For various reasons I need to finally upload my notes on “differential cohomology in a cohesive ∞-topos” to the arXiv. Soon. Maybe by next week or so.

    It’s not fully finalized, clearly, I could spend ages further polishing this – but then it will probably never be fully finalized, as so many other things.

    Anyway, in case anyone here might enjoy eyeballing pieces of it (again), I am keeping the latest version here

    • CommentRowNumber2.
    • CommentAuthorDavid_Corfield
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2013

    A magnum opus! Just picked up a handful of typos for now:

    p. 19 typicaly; geoemtric quantization; disccuss; integran

    p. 21 desireable

    p. 22 informstion

    p. 33 Whith; geometirc

    • CommentRowNumber3.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2013

    Thanks! Fixed now.

    • CommentRowNumber4.
    • CommentAuthorDavid_Corfield
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2013

    p. 39 inernalization

    p. 40 contravarian

    p. 40 missing word “With a notion of bare spaces give, a notion of geometric spaces comes with a forgetful functor GeometricSpaces \to BareSpaces that forgets this structure.”

    p. 41 the the

    p. 41 am essentially

    • CommentRowNumber5.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2013

    Thanks!

    I just killed 17 more ” the the “.

    • CommentRowNumber6.
    • CommentAuthorZhen Lin
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2013
    • (edited Oct 23rd 2013)

    The Elephant is from 2002, not 2003, and the author has a middle initial (T).

    p.57 “convenient categories for geometry - as in” should have a dash, not a hyphen (similar problems elsewhere); the next paragraph has mismatched double quote marks.

    p.59 “grouopoid”

    p.60 “analously”

    p.61 “let $\Lambda^i [n] \hookrightarrow \Delta [n]” (lowercase letter at the beginning of a paragraph)

    p.62 “cagtegorical”

    p.63 “\infty-Sheaves / \infty-stacks” (inconsistent capitalisation)

    p.64 “we will see that for all group objects” (incomplete sentence?)

    p.65 “Milnor-Lurie” (dash, not hyphen; same problem everywhere), “coeffients”

    p.67 First diagram has two objects labelled V 0V_0; and shouldn’t subscripts be superscripts here?

    p.68 “we shall say” (lowercase letter at beginning of paragraph)

    p.240 “euivalent”

    p.348 “disucssion”

    • CommentRowNumber7.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2013

    Oh, thanks!

    Am fixing this now.

    (Concerning middle initials: I have the tendency of omitting middle initials consistently. Also here on the nLab. Hope that’s okay…)

    • CommentRowNumber8.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2013

    Concerning the hyphens:

    in the source these are all coded as

     --
    

    hm, should I make it

     ---
    

    ?

    • CommentRowNumber9.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2013

    concerning the lower case: at some point I seem to have decided that after a colon I should continue in lower case. Probably a wrong decision.

    • CommentRowNumber10.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2013

    Concerning that incomplete sentence: completed now, it was supposed to mention the nice fact that every \infty-group object in an \infty-topos over an \infty-cohesive site has a presentation by a presheaf of simplicial groups.

    • CommentRowNumber11.
    • CommentAuthorMike Shulman
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2013

    Until recently, I thought that everyone continued in lower case after a colon. Apparently some people do otherwise, but it seems correct to me: the colon doesn’t end the sentence, so why would you need to capitalize after it?

    • CommentRowNumber12.
    • CommentAuthorZhen Lin
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2013

    Indeed. On the other hand, starting a new paragraph (after a colon or otherwise) seems to call for an uppercase letter.

    Regarding -- and ---: these are both dashes (“en” and “em”, respectively), but I was pointing out instances of plain - where a dash is called for.

    • CommentRowNumber13.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2013

    Okay, thanks, I see.

    Have added acknowledgements, too.

    • CommentRowNumber14.
    • CommentAuthorDavid_Corfield
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2013

    Apparently you have ten cases of ’allows to’.

    In the UK at least, you have to say ’allows us to’.

    • CommentRowNumber15.
    • CommentAuthorZhen Lin
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2013

    Missed a couple of hyphens/dashes in the abstract. Assuming you aren’t doing very much subtraction, it might be good to search the whole document for instances of <space>-<space> and replace them with <space>--<space> where appropriate.

    (My full name is Zhen Lin Low, by the way.)

    • CommentRowNumber16.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2013
    • (edited Oct 23rd 2013)

    Okay, have fixed your name now.

    Concerning the hyphens: not sure what’s going on with the output, but it’s really as I said above, those in the text are all coded as

      --
    
    • CommentRowNumber17.
    • CommentAuthorZhen Lin
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2013

    Very strange. Can you send me some source files to have a look? Perhaps there is some unexpected action-at-distance.

    • CommentRowNumber18.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2013

    Okay, I’ll send you my source now. Thanks for that much energy on your part.

    (Hope you can stand the look of the code…)

    • CommentRowNumber19.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 26th 2013

    Some edits today: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/12630719/cohesivedocument131025.pdf

    • cleaned up the sub-section structure of “1.2 Geometry of physics”

    • added a brief “2.2.1 Dependent homotopy type theory and Locally Cartesian closed \infty-categories”

    • added some content in “6. Outlook: Motivic quantization of local prequantum field theory”

    • CommentRowNumber20.
    • CommentAuthorDavid_Corfield
    • CommentTimeOct 26th 2013

    In 1.1.1 we give a heuristic motivation from considerations in gauge theory in broad terms; then in 1.1.2 and 1.1.4 a more technical motivation…

    why doesn’t 1.1.3 get a mention?

    • CommentRowNumber21.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 26th 2013

    Thanks, fixed now.

    Here is the new version https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/12630719/cohesivedocument131026.pdf

    differing from the one last night by minor adjustments and mostly by having plenty of broken links fixed. Plenty, but not quite all yet.

    • CommentRowNumber22.
    • CommentAuthorAndrew Stacey
    • CommentTimeOct 26th 2013

    Based on the quote in #20, I’ll give this one a miss! I don’t want to get into a fight about “heuristic” again.

    • CommentRowNumber23.
    • CommentAuthorTodd_Trimble
    • CommentTimeOct 26th 2013
    • (edited Oct 26th 2013)

    Andrew, I’m sincerely interested in knowing how you think people are using the word wrongly. I’ve looked up the word and have tried puzzling it out on my own on occasion.

    I tried asking you here but got no reply. Perhaps I came off as rude, I don’t know. Would you please tell us? I won’t get into a fight with you, I promise. I just want to know.

    Edit: Never mind – will post separately.

    • CommentRowNumber24.
    • CommentAuthorDavid_Corfield
    • CommentTimeOct 27th 2013

    In the diagram on the top of p.565 you have superGrpd\infty super Grpd, where you should have SuperGrpdSuper \infty Grpd.

    By the way, with these three dimensions of yours, shouldn’t there be eight possibilities as the choice of zero/nonzero is made for each dimension? That should give in addition what you call InfGrpdInf \infty Grpd and what I haven’t seen yet InfSuperGrpdInf Super \infty Grpd.

    • CommentRowNumber25.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 27th 2013

    concerning “heuristics”: actually the gauge principle is a strong heuristic for solving the problem of “What is a space of physical fields?” If you just translate it verbatim to formal language, you get the right answer: “It is a higher geometric stack.”

    • CommentRowNumber26.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 27th 2013
    • (edited Oct 27th 2013)

    I have worked a bit now on “1.1 Motivation” (see the new https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/12630719/cohesivedocument131027.pdf), which had been a section somewhat orphaned. I have added

    • at the very beginning (p. 16) a lead-in via Hilbert’s sixth problem, along the lines of my “synthetic QFT” notes;

    • have re-arranged the subsections a bit to make them flow more naturally,

    • have added to the beginning of “1.1.4 Philosophical motivation” pointers to both Science of Logic and to Some Thoughts on the Future of Category Theory.

    All this could do with more work, still. But I guess I have to leave it at that for the time being.

    • CommentRowNumber27.
    • CommentAuthorDavid_Corfield
    • CommentTimeOct 27th 2013

    You’re in good company. Have you read the introduction to Hermann Weyl’s Raum - Zeit - Materie? He wrote it in a very Husserlian frame of mind.

    • CommentRowNumber28.
    • CommentAuthorZhen Lin
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2013

    @Urs

    It seems those bugs introduced by special characters I pointed out have returned.

    Is there a standard definition for ‘concordance’ as in §3.8.2? The only other place I have ever seen the word is in [Moerdijk, Classifying spaces and classifying topoi].

    • CommentRowNumber29.
    • CommentAuthorDavidRoberts
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2013
    • (edited Oct 28th 2013)

    @Zhen Lin - usually concordance E 0E 1E_0 \sim E_1 of bundles over a space XX is defined as the existence of a bundle EE over X×[0,1]X\times [0,1] such that E iE| X×{i}E_i \simeq E\big|_{X\times\{i\}}.

    It’s certainly not a recent coinage.

    • CommentRowNumber30.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2013
    • (edited Oct 28th 2013)

    The notion of concordance is quite standard. Somebody should add a list of literature to concordance. When googling for hits, “concordance class” yields the best results.

    • CommentRowNumber31.
    • CommentAuthorDavidRoberts
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2013
    • (edited Oct 28th 2013)

    (facepalm) :-S (let me edit that out and retain some dignity)

    • CommentRowNumber32.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2013

    Sure, edited out.

    • CommentRowNumber33.
    • CommentAuthorDavid_Corfield
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2013

    have plenty inspiring conversation

    plenty of inspiring conversations

    Last not least

    Last but not least

    We start with the general statement in 1.1.1 and then look at its incarnations following the history of physics in 1.1.1.

    Sounds odd as this is already in 1.1.1.

    Perhaps “In this section we start…”

    is equipped differentiable (smooth) structure.

    insert “with a”

    Mathematicall

    The fist two of these; first Stiefe-Whitney class; a Dirac operato

    contravarian functors

    • CommentRowNumber34.
    • CommentAuthorDavid_Corfield
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2013

    In [Law91] Lawvere refers to cohesive toposes as Categories of Being and refers to the phenomenon exhibited by the adjunctions that define them as Becoming, thereby following the terminology of [He1841] and in effect proposing a formal interpretation of Hegel’s ontology in topos theory (much like the original interpretation of “natural” in category theory).

    I don’t understand the contents of the parentheses. The original interpretation of “natural” is “much like” what?

    we wiil construct

    in 3.9 we a comprehensive discussion

    • CommentRowNumber35.
    • CommentAuthorAndrew Stacey
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2013

    p147

    This definition of concrete smooth spaces (expressed slightly differently but equivalently) goes back to [Chen77]. A comprehensive textbook account of differential geometry formulated with this definition of smooth spaces (called “diffeological spaces” there) is in [11].

    Chen spaces are not equivalent to diffeological spaces. That was the whole point of Comparative Smootheology.

    • CommentRowNumber36.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2013

    Thanks for all the input.

    • Fixed all the typos that David pointed out.

    • Added citation to Comparative smootheology

    Have also expanded the very last section “6. Outlook”.

    https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/12630719/cohesivedocument.pdf

    • CommentRowNumber37.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2013
    • (edited Oct 28th 2013)

    Sorry for the telegraphic message, my battery was dying.

    @David: I have removed that parenthetical remark, as it is not important anyway. What I meant to express is that I see Lawvere’s way of reading Hegel and trying to translate the terms found there into precise definitions in category theory as being in continuation of the the way that Eilenberg and MacLane translated the word “natural” into category theory.

    I know the reasons for complaining about making “natural” a technical term (Mike complains about it every now and then, I think) but for understanding “Science of Logic” I understand now that this may be very fruitful, and I suppose that is what Lawvere has been doing all along.

    When one goes to Volume 1, Book 1, Section 1, Chapter 1 “Being” of “Science of Logic” I gather the general reader’s rection is profound puzzlement. But if one reads it as a prose riddle “Guess which constructs in homotopy type theory Hegel is secretly talking about!” then it may become quite inspiring.

    This reminds me of what somebody recently said somewhere, in reply to the question if the specific syntax of type theory is important, something like: “Not so important. If Aristotle had danced his syllogisms instead of writing them down as chains of symbols, we might be using very different means to code these days. “

    • CommentRowNumber38.
    • CommentAuthorDavid_Corfield
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2013

    Though I doubt Mac Lane would have read Hegel, we know he did immerse himself in philosophy while in Gottingen. At the moment I’m reading Thomas Ryckman’s The Reign of Relativity. It devotes considerable space to how much Weyl’s formulations of geometry and unified field theory owed to Husserlian phenomenology. And Mac Lane would have been exposed to phenomenology in the 1930s.

    An invited chapter, for which my current proposal begins as below, would have me look into such matters.

    Looking through Robert Torretti’s book ’Philosophy of Geometry from Riemann to Poincaré’ (1978), it is natural to wonder why, at least in the Anglophone community, we currently have no such subject today. By and large it is fair to say that any philosophical interest in geometry shown there is directed at the appearance of geometric constructions in physics, without any thought being given to the conceptual development of the subject within mathematics itself. This is a result of a conception we owe to the Vienna Circle and their Berlin colleagues that one should sharply distinguish between mathematical geometry and physical geometry. Inspired by Einstein’s relativity theory, this account, due to Schlick and Reichenbach, takes mathematical geometry to be the study of the logical consequences of some Hilbertian axiomatisation. For its application in physics, in addition to a mathematical geometric theory, one needs laws of physics and then ‘coordinating principles’ which relate these laws to empirical observations. From this position, the mathematics itself fades from view, as a more or less convenient choice in which to express a physical theory. No interest is taken in which axiomatic theories deserve the epithet ‘geometric’.

    However, in the 1920s this view of geometry was not the only one put forward. Hermann Weyl, similarly inspired by relativity theory, was led to very different conclusions. His attempted unification of electromagnetism with relativity theory, was the product of a coherent geometric, physical and philosophical vision. While this unification was not directly successful, it did give rise to modern gauge field theory. Weyl, of course, also went on to make a considerable contribution to quantum theory. And while Einstein gave initial support to Moritz Schlick’s account of his theory, he later became an advocate of the idea that mathematics provides important conceptual frameworks in which to do physics:

    “Experience can of course guide us in our choice of serviceable mathematical concepts; it cannot possibly be the source from which they are derived; experience of course remains the sole criterion of the serviceability of a mathematical construction for physics, but the truly creative principle resides in mathematics” (Herbert Spencer Lecture, Oxford 1933)

    We may imagine then that an important chapter in any sequel to Torretti’s book would describe both Reichenbach’s and Weyl’s views on geometry. This is done in Thomas Ryckman’s excellent The Reign of Relativity (Oxford 2005). Ryckman ends his book with a call for philosophical inquiry into “what sense a ‘geometrized physics’ can have”. It seems that the time is right to take up this challenge in the context of a new foundational approach to geometry provided by higher category theory.

    We’ve had the issue raised before about whether to understand Per Martin-Lof one needs to look at his philosophical inspiration – Husserl, Brentano, etc. It would be quite a coincidence if both homotopy type theory (Martin-Lof) and gauge theory (Weyl) owed their origins partly to Husserl, and this to be without merit. On the other hand, I can’t say I find Husserl pleasant to read, although I know Rota enormously admired him.

    I wonder if ultimately it’s less the particularities of the philosophies and more the drive that philosophy provides to provide simple conceptual foundations that is important.

    • CommentRowNumber39.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2013

    Hi David,

    sounds interesting. You have to bear with my ignorance, but can you give me a pointer to Husserl’s writing or an account of them, that makes me understand what you refer to in #27?

    • CommentRowNumber40.
    • CommentAuthorDavid_Corfield
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2013

    Maybe easiest for you is to read Weyl himself, the ten or so pages of the introduction. There’s a free online copy of Space, Time and Matter here, though of course you should prefer the original German here.

    A very Husserlian passage begins

    Expressed as a general principle, this means that the real world, and every one of its constituents with their accompanying characteristics, are, and can only be given as, intentional objects of acts of consciousness. The immediate data which I receive are the experiences of consciousness in just the form in which I receive them. They are not composed of the mere stuff of perception, as many Positivists assert, but we may say that in a sensation an object, for example, is actually physically present for me—to whom that sensation relates—in a manner known to every one, yet, since it is characteristic, it cannot be described more fully. Following Brentano, I shall call it the “intentional object”.

    Ryckman points out how unexpected it is to come across such a passage in a standard textbook for relativity theory, but still Weyl clearly thought highly of it as it was preserved through many editions. Looking ahead in Ryckman it seems that Weyl’s Husserlianism made him refuse to accept Cartan’s moving frame formalism.

    It seems to me rather a different inspiration from that of Hegel on Lawvere as you mention in #37. By thinking about the structure of the contents of one’s consciousness, somehow one derives certain principles governing them. You’re certainly not trying to capture the world as it is in itself, but nor are you studying some Logic of the Idea, as with Hegel. Still, something was working for Weyl, as within a few brief months in 1918 he brought out Raum, Das Kontinuum and the paper unifying electromagnetism and relativity theory.

    • CommentRowNumber41.
    • CommentAuthorFosco
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2013
    • (edited Oct 28th 2013)

    Referring to https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/12630719/cohesivedocument.pdf last line page 219:

    is a cofibration and C and is in addition a weak equivalence

    you probably mean “is a cofibration in C”

    • CommentRowNumber42.
    • CommentAuthorMike Shulman
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2013

    Re:#12, FWIW, en-dashes and em-dashes have different uses. A dash in the middle of text—like this—should almost always be an em-dash; en-dashes are mostly used for ranges of numbers, like “pages 1–3”.

    • CommentRowNumber43.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2013

    @David, thanks, I’ll look into it.

    @Fosco, thanks! Fixed now. Could you tell me your full name?

    • CommentRowNumber44.
    • CommentAuthorFosco
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2013

    Fosco (Name) Loregian (surname)

    Sorry for my lack of good manners, I’ll add up more info on the page here in nlab in a couple of days, as I promised!

    • CommentRowNumber45.
    • CommentAuthorDavid_Corfield
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2013

    From ’General Abstract’

    when in interpreted

    no ’in’

    these intrinsic constructions reproduce the ordinary Chern-Weil homomorphism, hence ordinary Chern-Simons functionals and ordinary Wess-Zumino-Witten functionals, provides their geometric prequantization in higher codimension (localized down to the point) and generalizes this…

    ’provide’ and ’generalize’

    conclude that cohesive 1-topos provide

    toposES

    • CommentRowNumber46.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2013

    Fixed. Wow David, your input is impressive. I owe you something.

    • CommentRowNumber47.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2013

    @Fosco, no problem, but I cannot acknowledge your typo-spotting without knowing your full name.

    • CommentRowNumber48.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2013

    What’s the name of the feeling when the last “undefined reference”-warning has disappeared?

    • CommentRowNumber49.
    • CommentAuthorDavid_Corfield
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2013

    Since These are \infty-colimit construction, they are preserves

    3 typos there.

    • CommentRowNumber50.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2013

    Thanks. Two of them I had already caught. If you are really still reading (thanks!) please check the latest version here https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/12630719/cohesivedocument.pdf.

    • CommentRowNumber51.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2013

    Grr, the arXiv compiler strips off the index. Does anyone know if one can do something about this? I’d like this to have an index, weird as it may be.

    • CommentRowNumber52.
    • CommentAuthorDavid_Corfield
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2013

    Khler polarization; correspondence of correspondence

    • CommentRowNumber53.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2013

    Thanks! Fixed.

    • CommentRowNumber54.
    • CommentAuthorZhen Lin
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2013

    @Urs 51

    It’s probably not running LaTeX enough times. Perhaps you include the necessary idx or aux files?

    • CommentRowNumber55.
    • CommentAuthorDavidRoberts
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2013
    • (edited Oct 29th 2013)

    Assorted comments.

    Under

    1.2.8.7 Examples of \infty-connections

    you have a list where one of the items is empty.

    Under remark 1.2.185:

    consisting of a 1-form with values in the path Lie algebra of g, a 2-form with values in the loop Lie algebra

    ’with values in’ here is a little bit awkward. Perhaps ’valued in’? If this is throughout then nevermind.

    On the other hand, the data of forms in the equation Lie algebra

    ’equation’ is think shouldn’t be there

    In section 1.2.9.1, you are using both U(N) and U(n), but u(n) for the Lie algebra. Also some mixing of so(n), so(N) and Spin(N). I guess you want to stick with upper-case N to avoid conflation with n being the categorical dimension?

    Around

    of based paths in Spin(N) to double intersections

    the style is jumping between italicised and upright for the Lie group Spin(N).

    In 1.2.9.2

    All the construction that we consider here in this introduction serve to mode this abstract operation

    ’constructions’, and not sure about the ’mode’

    In 1.2.9.2.1

    This evidently yields a morphism of simplicial presheaves

    ’evidently’ here is perhaps weaker than you intend. The two meanings of the word (cf https://www.google.com/search?q=definition+evidently) are quite opposite. This may just be me, though, leaping to the wrong conclusion. (The usage further down the page feels different to me, and leans towards the stronger meaning.)

    it assigns circle n-bundles with connection whose curvature is this cuvature characteristic form

    n here needs to be in maths mode, and ’cuvature’.

    In 1.2.9.2.2, in the sentence beginning

    The real object of interest is the k-truncated version

    there are some errant parentheses. Then, in the sentence beginning

    Suppose g is such that the

    there is \stackrel{\simeq}{\to}\simeq

    In the list in 1.2.10, you have a space and comma transposed:

    The classical action ,the Legendre transform and Hamiltonian flows;

    In the ’historical comment’ you have a missing ’n’

    canonical transformations”, hence symplectomorphisms, betwee them.

    The equation in example 1.2.91 has its terminating comma floating weirdly between the lines. You also have “kinetic energy density” but “potential energy density”

    In remark 1.2.195 you have

    One may think of def.

    but use ’Definition’ in full later in the paragraph. Also, missing l in

    information about all possibe coordinate transformations

    Definition 1.2.197

    the coverage (Grothendieck pre-topology), of good open covers

    has superfluous comma.

    For the discussion of presymplectic manifolds

    Sometimes you use ’presymplectic’, sometimes ’pre-symplectic’.

    In example 1.2.198 you have ’X discX_{disc} set’ rather than ’set X discX_{disc}’.

    After this you mention

    More details on this are below in 1.2.3

    where 1.2.3 is 100 pages back.

    In 1.2.199

    thes smooth spaces

    ’these’.

    In 1.2.201 the two symplectic manifolds’ symplectic forms are mangled (ω1\omega-1 and ω\omega instead of ω 1\omega_1 and ω 2\omega_2).

    In definition 1.2.205 the general relation uses a funny inclusion arrow (I think it’s an xy diagram instead of just \hookrightarrow in maths mode).

    In the sentence beginning

    To make this clearer, notice that we may equivalently rewrite every relation

    you use maps i Xi_X and i Yi_Y but don’t define them. They probably should be p Xp_X and p Yp_Y, based on the diagram.

    Each such trajectory would “relate”

    the opening quotes are the wrong way around.

    In definition 1.2.207, should the word ’correspondence’ be italicised?

    The diagram under the sentence beginning

    The space with this property is precisely the fiber product

    has a bunch of nodes changing labels (XX, YY and ZZ on one side, and X 1X_1 to X 3X_3 on the other)

    • CommentRowNumber56.
    • CommentAuthorDavidRoberts
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2013
    • (edited Oct 29th 2013)

    One Four more, pluck’d at random. Definition 3.9.116 has

    and woth symmetric monoidal

    3.9.14.4 has

    Under this equivalence that single object is indeed idenited

    3.10.14 has

    HH th\mathbf{H} \hookrightarrow \in \mathbf{H}_{th}

    Proof of 3.10.26

    Therefore we have a retract

    is followed by a symbol-mash.

    • CommentRowNumber57.
    • CommentAuthorMike Shulman
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2013

    We didn’t have any trouble with the index in the HoTT book. You need to include the .ind file.

    • CommentRowNumber58.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2013

    Thanks, David, for all these typos!! I have fixed all those you pointed out now and added an acknowledgement.

    And thanks, Zhen Lin and Mike, for the info about the index. I should have thought of that myself. Thanks.

    • CommentRowNumber59.
    • CommentAuthorDavidRoberts
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2013

    Thanks, Urs. I meant to get started earlier, to catch more before it went up. I’ll keep looking at chunks of it to help with the continuous improvement.

    • CommentRowNumber60.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2013

    Thanks, David, that’s good. There will indeed be a few more cycles of polishing. But I had to post this now.

    • CommentRowNumber61.
    • CommentAuthorDavid_Corfield
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2013

    in section 1.2, the list of sections has

    3.9.7 Chern-Weil theory

    rather than

    1.2.9 The Chern-Weil homomorphism

    1.2.1.1 has

    bf Premise.

    • CommentRowNumber62.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2013

    Thanks! Fixed now.

    • CommentRowNumber63.
    • CommentAuthorDavid_Corfield
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2013

    Hmm, I came across a supposedly fixed typo from #33

    The fist two of these are classical.

    Also you seem to have fixed the second typo from #61 but not the first, concerning section numbering. While you’re on that page (p. 45), there’s also

    vial Higher correspondences

    • CommentRowNumber64.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2013

    woops. Thanks for checking super-carefully. Now it should all be fixed. Thanks again.

    • CommentRowNumber65.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2013

    I should say: I am mostly out of action today, as we have various seminars now.

    I had already submitted to the arXiv last night, but can still update until 8:pm GMT today. So when the seminars are over I’ll come back and do a last round of checking.

    • CommentRowNumber66.
    • CommentAuthorDavid_Corfield
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2013

    This is probably my final list then:

    their appeareance

    too many e’s

    Stiefel-Whiney class

    coresponding

    under the diagram on p.22

    As shown there, an element in H n(X;)H_n(X; \mathbb{Z}) involves an underlying ordinary integral class

    H n(X;)H^n(X; \mathbb{Z}) should be H diff n(X;)H^n_{diff}(X; \mathbb{Z})

    the evident fact that the category Top of topological spaces does, of course, not encode smooth structure.

    ‘of course’ wrongly placed, but unnecessary anyway because of ‘evident’.

    In the sentence in 1.1.2 beginning

    In the next step there is

    You have ‘is’ before and after the equation, and are missing the ‘2-bundle’ from ‘String principal 2-bundle’.

    differential geoemtry

    we are lead

    ‘led’

    we formall invert

    • CommentRowNumber67.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2013

    thanks, as soon as they grant me a minute here, i’ll implement. Thanks so very much for all your comments!

    • CommentRowNumber68.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2013

    Okay, these typos I have fixed now all (I think!). Thanks again!

    • CommentRowNumber69.
    • CommentAuthorDavid_Corfield
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2013

    2 hours to go. From a one page sample (p. 187):

    phyiscal fields

    only along local diffeomorphism

    needs ’s’

    the signture

    And an ’allow to’, along with nine others in the document, e.g.,

    allows to express

    which needs a direct object, so ’allows us to express’ or ’allows the expression of’.

    Hopefully, that was an unlucky sample :)

    • CommentRowNumber70.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2013

    Thanks, David! All fixed now.

    Concerning luck: luckily I am one hour ahead of GMT ;-)

    I should say that it is clear that the whole document can do with a good more polishing. I am posting now anyway for various reasons.

    • CommentRowNumber71.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 30th 2013
    • (edited Oct 30th 2013)

    Here it is

    Thanks again to everyone who helped make it a tad better!

    • CommentRowNumber72.
    • CommentAuthorDavidRoberts
    • CommentTimeOct 30th 2013

    Page 5 - “\infty-tpoposes” :-)

    Should I just keep posting them here?

    • CommentRowNumber73.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 30th 2013

    Fixed! :-)

    Yes, as long as you have the energy, I’ll definitely appreciate being told about more typos.

    • CommentRowNumber74.
    • CommentAuthorAndrew Stacey
    • CommentTimeOct 30th 2013
    • CommentRowNumber75.
    • CommentAuthorRodMcGuire
    • CommentTimeOct 31st 2013

    The arXiv abstract contains the word “caracteristic”.

    • CommentRowNumber76.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeOct 31st 2013

    Gee, thanks. I’ll fix that with the next replacement. Grr.

    • CommentRowNumber77.
    • CommentAuthorDavidRoberts
    • CommentTimeNov 1st 2013

    Lucky the typo wasn’t in the title :-P

    • CommentRowNumber78.
    • CommentAuthorMarc Hoyois
    • CommentTimeNov 23rd 2013

    @Urs:

    I think Prop. 3.2.2 (3) is wrong (“local implies hypercomplete”). Your definition of a locally local (∞,1)-topos is basically a condition on the final object, so there’s no reason to expect that it would imply hypercompleteness (which is a local condition, unlike that of being locally local!). For example, the (∞,1)-topos of étale sheaves on all kk-schemes, for kk an algebraically closed field, is local but it’s not always hypercomplete.

    • CommentRowNumber79.
    • CommentAuthorMarc Hoyois
    • CommentTimeNov 23rd 2013

    Also, in Prop. 4.3.7 and 4.4.9 (and maybe also 4.5.10), there’s no need to take the hypercompletion on the right-hand side: see this mathoverflow answer.

    • CommentRowNumber80.
    • CommentAuthorMarc Hoyois
    • CommentTimeNov 24th 2013
    • (edited Nov 24th 2013)

    I think the following is an example of a cohesive (∞,1)-topos which is not hypercomplete.

    Let CubesCubes be the full subcategory of topological spaces that are homeomorphic to

    nX n \prod_{n\in \mathbb{N}} X_n

    where each X nX_n is either ptpt, (0,1)(0,1), [0,1)[0,1), or [0,1][0,1]. Let

    HSh (Cubes). \mathbf{H} \coloneqq Sh_\infty(Cubes).

    Any QCubesQ\in Cubes has a base of open sets BCubesB\subset Cubes which is moreover closed under finite intersections, so that Sh (Q)Sh (B)Sh_\infty(Q)\simeq Sh_\infty(B), and it is clear that the embedding i:BCubes /Qi\colon B\hookrightarrow Cubes_{/Q} is continuous and cocontinuous. We therefore have an essential geometric morphism

    i !i *i *:Sh (Q)H /Q i_! \dashv i^* \dashv i_*\colon Sh_\infty(Q)\to \mathbf{H}_{/Q}

    with i !i_! and i *i_* fully faithful. From this we deduce that H\mathbf{H} is not hypercomplete, since QQ can be the Hilbert cube. We also deduce that

    Shape(H /Q)Shape(Sh (Q)) Shape(\mathbf{H}_{/Q})\simeq Shape(Sh_\infty(Q))

    which is contractible since QQ is paracompact and contractible (HA, A.1.4). In particular, H\mathbf{H} is totally strongly ∞-connected. Finally, Γ:HGrpd\Gamma\colon \mathbf{H}\to \infty Grpd preserves colimits because the final object ptCubespt\in Cubes has a unique covering sieve.

    • CommentRowNumber81.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeNov 24th 2013
    • (edited Nov 24th 2013)

    Ah, you are right. I dropped the “locally” from the assumption in HTT cor. 7.2.1.12. (At homotopy dimension I still got it right…) Luckily this can be fixed. I’ll update the file later this week. Thanks.

    • CommentRowNumber82.
    • CommentAuthorMarc Hoyois
    • CommentTimeNov 24th 2013

    The hypothesis of 7.2.1.12 can actually be weakened a bit: you only need 𝒳\mathcal{X} to be locally of finite homotopy dimension to show that every object is the limit of its Postnikov tower, hence hypercomplete. On the other hand, to show that 𝒳=lim n𝒳 n\mathcal{X}=\lim_{n}\mathcal{X}_{\leq n}, you need 𝒳\mathcal{X} to be locally of homotopy dimension n\leq n for some fixed nn.

    So, do you plan to restrict the definition of cohesion, or should the theory include infinite-dimensional examples like this?

    • CommentRowNumber83.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeNov 24th 2013
    • (edited Nov 24th 2013)

    I don’t see a need to restrict the axioms. I invoke hypercompleteness just as a means of computing with my models.

    • CommentRowNumber84.
    • CommentAuthorMike Shulman
    • CommentTimeNov 25th 2013

    I do wish that you wouldn’t conflate “homotopy type theory” with “\infty-topos theory”. They are different, though related, subjects. E.g. section 2 should really be called “\infty-topos theory”.

    Also I’m a bit sad that you’ve decided to say “\infty-connected” for what should really be “locally \infty-connected and \infty-connected”.

    • CommentRowNumber85.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeNov 25th 2013
    • (edited Nov 25th 2013)

    Hey, I don’t say “\infty-connected” the way that makes you sad. At least not in def. 3.3.1 where it is introduced and not in def. 3.4.1 where it is picked up in the context of cohesion.

    Maybe I got careless elsewhere? I’ll fix it if you point me to it.

    Concerning conflation: I did by now well realize that the feeling in the HoTT community about this changed, but as you were once among the first to be fond of, the old homotopy-type theory is usually written without that hyphen and it’s a lucky coincidence, not an unfortunate one.

    Other people complain when there are too many “\infty“-signs thrown around, especially in headlines. They say it “scares” them. For them I think saying “geometric homotopy theory” instead of “\infty-topos theory” is a real treat.

    I am drowned this week in other tasks, but then I will work on editing dcct again. I’ll see what I can do. But let’s all try generally not to be “saddened” and “scared” by mathematics too much. Let’s go for the good feelings. Life outside maths is sad and scary enough…

    • CommentRowNumber86.
    • CommentAuthorMike Shulman
    • CommentTimeNov 25th 2013

    Re: connectedness, I’m looking at and around the top of p44.

    I’ve never heard anyone say “homotopy-type theory”. The word used to be “algebraic topology”, then “homotopy theory”, and now “\infty-category theory”. Have you actually heard people say “homotopy-type theory” to mean that subject?

    • CommentRowNumber87.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2013

    ah, p. 44, right, I’ll change that.

    and I’ll try to make me think about what I’ll do with the conflating-seeming section titles (but not tonight, and maybe not this week)

    • CommentRowNumber88.
    • CommentAuthorDavid_Corfield
    • CommentTimeNov 27th 2013

    Typos on p. 196:

    to be regared

    as a generally covarnat,

    supporessing

    • CommentRowNumber89.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeNov 27th 2013

    Thanks! I’ll get back to editing dcct from next week, Wednesday on. No chance before that.

    • CommentRowNumber90.
    • CommentAuthorzskoda
    • CommentTimeNov 27th 2013
    • (edited Nov 27th 2013)

    Few bibliography corrections. First general one: many references miss comma after the title name, before the journal name, e.g. HeTe92, KaKrMi87, Mur96, Sc13a, Schw84, Sha97, Stee67, Stol96, Stre04, Zan05, Zi04, Wei89 etc.

    Some other bib typoi:

    Wi87 Wittem instead of Witten

    Hor89 Exactly soluable

    Law91, comma after Lawvere

    Toppan page number probably 518–583 (dash missing)

    I am very surprised that among the listed papers of B. Toën, G. Vezzosi, the most important one (from the point of view of this paper, I think), the HAG I paper, which is the first paper which proves in great detail and with systematic theory and rather clean exposition (in Segal category model) the Giraud’s theorem for (infinity,1)-topoi is missing. HAG II is however listed, as well as shorter proceedings version of Segal topoi theory. HAG II, full reference is Mem. Amer. Math. Soc. 193 (2008), no. 902.

    • CommentRowNumber91.
    • CommentAuthorzskoda
    • CommentTimeNov 27th 2013

    Now, more scientific question. I am sure you thought it through when I was not following those threads in nnForum, but the usage of shape theory in the paper confuses me. Page 243 says

    If by “size” we mean “nontriviality of homotopy groups”, hence nontriviality of shape of a > space, there is the notion of

    • shape of an ∞-topos ([L-Topos], section 7.1.6);

    which coincides with the topological shape of X in the case that H = Sh∞ (X), as above.

    This is very confusing. The shape theory is made precisely to study the topological spaces which are not CW complexes and for which homotopy groups are not useful, nor contain useful information. The classical example, Warsaw circle has all homotopy groups 00, but its shape is not the shape of a point, but the shape of a circle. Thus the topological shape of XX is by no means about “nontriviality of homotopy groups”, i.e. not about its weak homotopy type.

    • CommentRowNumber92.
    • CommentAuthorDavid_Corfield
    • CommentTimeDec 2nd 2013

    p. 198

    \infty-Lie algrboid

    • CommentRowNumber93.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeDec 2nd 2013
    • (edited Dec 2nd 2013)

    Thanks for all this!

    I am still intensely busy with some other tasks. Will get back to this as soon as there is a free slot. Thanks for all the input, everyone!

    • CommentRowNumber94.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeMay 12th 2014
    • (edited May 12th 2014)

    I am (or so I sincerly hope) slowly climbing out of the black hole that my time budget collapsed into when with enlarged family the fact that I am not working in the same country in which I live finally turned from curious into deadly. (This maybe as an excuse for the immense delay between this and the previous post.)

    I have now implemented the fixes pointed out above and added attribution. In particular I briefly fixed the issue pointed out by Marc Hoyois and added a pointer to his MO post for the fix. (That’s just the bare minimum one should do, I know, but at least it’s that.)

    Looking back at the document, there are a thousand things I should and would want to improve on (besides eventually adding a genuine section on quantization via linear cohesive homotopy types). I have to see what the gods decided how this is going to work out.

    Until the next arXiv version (which may take a while) I’ll keep a document with the latest changes at

    https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/12630719/dcct.pdf