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    • CommentRowNumber1.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeMay 12th 2017

    I gave locally compact topological space an Idea-section and added the other equivalent definition (here).

    • CommentRowNumber2.
    • CommentAuthorDavid_Corfield
    • CommentTimeMay 13th 2017

    Would some non-examples be helpful? The rationals as a subspace of the reals seems to be most frequently mentioned. And infinite-dimensional Hilbert space.

    • CommentRowNumber3.
    • CommentAuthorRichard Williamson
    • CommentTimeMay 13th 2017
    • (edited May 13th 2017)

    A very typical example is, for instance, {(0,0)}{(x,y)x>0}\{ (0, 0) \} \cup \{ (x,y) \mid x \gt 0 \} with the subspace topology from 2\mathbb{R}^{2}. Proving that this example is not locally compact is an excellent exercise (uses several basic facts about compactness and closure).

    • CommentRowNumber4.
    • CommentAuthorTodd_Trimble
    • CommentTimeMay 13th 2017

    Famously, locally compact spaces are not closed under infinite products in TopTop. They are closed under coproducts (of course), and under filtered colimits of open embeddings, as mentioned at ring of adeles.

    • CommentRowNumber5.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeMay 14th 2017
    • (edited May 14th 2017)

    Maybe #2 wasn’t so much asking for counter examples by themselves, as for their exposition being added to the entry.

    I have added now the counter-example of countably infinite product of a non-compact space.

    • CommentRowNumber6.
    • CommentAuthorDavid_Corfield
    • CommentTimeMay 14th 2017

    Yes, good to know both what and why some cases fail to satisfy a property. I added the rationals as a second counter-example. (About ’counter-example’, is it normally hyphenated? And isn’t it primarily used to refer to a case counting against a proposition, something we don’t have here? Or is there an implicit proposition its countering that all spaces are locally compact?)

    • CommentRowNumber7.
    • CommentAuthorDavid_Corfield
    • CommentTimeMay 14th 2017

    Is there anything abstract general to say about local compactness? Cohesion meets compactness?

    As for an abstract version of compactness, I see at compact object it’s noted that there’s a mismatch between compact object in TopTop and compact space. Do we know the answer to Todd’s question there?

    I don’t know if the story is any different for XX compact Hausdorff, but it could be worth considering.

    • CommentRowNumber8.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeMay 14th 2017

    About ’counter-example’, is it normally hyphenated? And isn’t it primarily used to refer to a case counting against a proposition, something we don’t have here?

    How about “Nonexample”?

    • CommentRowNumber9.
    • CommentAuthorTodd_Trimble
    • CommentTimeMay 14th 2017

    I don’t (normally) hyphenate “counterexample”. (My spell-checker didn’t balk when I just wrote that. Don’t know how a UK spell-checker would react.)

    Looking over the entry, I propose that Zoran’s comment is obsolete, but I also propose that what appears above it shouldn’t really be called a proof. I’d be inclined to remove the proof environment, or else properly prove it instead of farming it out.

    I’d have to think hard about my earlier comment about compact objects in TopTop (from the Café), but I guess I’m a little skeptical that the situation would be any different for compact Hausdorff. For the moment I’m happy with applying Johnstone’s terminology to capture compact spaces (see compact element) and accepting that the compact object condition is probably too strong, although I also sense that the business about closed inclusions between T 1T_1 spaces is a hack that could be improved somewhat.

    • CommentRowNumber10.
    • CommentAuthorTim_Porter
    • CommentTimeMay 14th 2017
    • (edited May 14th 2017)

    I just found a webpage in which it states: ’OED does not include counterexample, but it does include counter-argument (note the hyphen).’ I have the shorter OED and it gives neither. The web OED gives the non-hyphenated form! Confusion.

    FWIW: The ’counter’ is, I think, the English version of ‘contre’ in French, and in that language, the norm would seem to be ’contre-exemple’.

    • CommentRowNumber11.
    • CommentAuthorDavid_Corfield
    • CommentTimeMay 14th 2017

    Yes, but perhaps ’nonexample’ is better, #8.

    • CommentRowNumber12.
    • CommentAuthorTodd_Trimble
    • CommentTimeMay 14th 2017

    The OED has some catching up to do, obviously. But let’s face it: “counterexample” is generally a pretty math-y term. There must be thousands of recognized math terms that are not in the OED.

    If to hyphenate or not to hyphenate is a US/UK thing, then so be it. Disputes over such things are so boring. Meanwhile, there is no disputing the fact that the unhyphenated (un-hyphenated?) form is very widespread.

    • CommentRowNumber13.
    • CommentAuthorTim_Porter
    • CommentTimeMay 14th 2017
    • (edited May 14th 2017)

    I also think it is not important but here ’non-example’ (or nonexample) might fit the bill better. (I myself tend to hyphenate when a composite word looks too long for me or difficult to understand without the hyphen.) I was surprised that ’counterexample’ was not in the shorter OED as the word is quite often met in ordinary non-mathematical discourse.

    • CommentRowNumber14.
    • CommentAuthorUrs
    • CommentTimeMay 18th 2017

    The definition section at locally compact topological space used to essentially just point to Wikipedia for the issue of alternative definitions.

    Now two alternative definitions are actually stated, and proof of their equivalence in the Hausdorff case is spelled out, here.

    More alternatives (and their conditional equivalences) could be added.